Joe Biden revealed the first deepest infrared image of the universe from the James Webb Space Telescope

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Since the James Webb Space Telescope entered orbit a few months ago, the expectations of space scientists have increased due to the results that this space observatory was going to provide to planet Earth with its images. Yesterday, Monday, July 11, the first great example of what he is capable of doing was shown.

Through a presidential presentation, the president of the United States, Joe Biden, presented what is, until now, the deepest infrared image of the universe.

The head of state revealed the image of the galaxy cluster SMACS 0723, known as the first Webb Deep Field, during an event at the White House. ahead of NASA and ESA.

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A post shared by President Joe Biden (@potus)

[Hubble de la NASA: Así es como una estrella enana blanca está devorando a sus propios planetas]

First “poetic” image of the universe

The image presented by Biden shows a small slice of the sky, comparable to the wingspan of a grain of sand held at arm’s length, greatly enhanced by the light-gathering power of JWST. The result is a view of thousands of galaxies. The most remote date from a time more than 13 billion years ago, not long after the dawn of the universe, and have been magnified in view by a massive galaxy in the foreground.

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“It’s a new window into the history of our universe,” President Biden said. “Today we are seeing the first light shining through that window.”

NASA-sponsored sites say Webb’s sharp near-infrared view showed faint structures in extremely distant galaxies to provide the most detailed view of the early universe to date.

“Capturing all of this was in one day’s work. (Literally! Webb captured this image in less than a day, while similar images from Hubble can take weeks) ”, exposes the US space agency on its Instagram account where it also clarifies that this is not the most distant image that has been viewed. “Non-infrared missions like COBE and WMAP saw the universe closer to the Big Bang (about 380,000 years later), when there was microwave background radiation, but no stars or galaxies. Webb sees about 100 million years later,” they add.

The official presentation of the five color images from the James Webb telescope will take place this Tuesday the 12th, starting at 9:45 Eastern time, the same time in Chile, and at 8:45 in Mexico. NASA TV and ESA TV will broadcast live.

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