Time travel is possible, according to this physicist: this is how it would work

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Time travel sounds like the stuff of science fiction, but according to one physicist, it’s possible to make it happen. his name is Barak Shoshany and belongs to the Brock University, from Ontario, Canada. What is his theory?

For Shoshany, traveling to the past is feasible, always relying on the Albert Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics, creating the so-called exotic matter.

Shoshany, along with Jacob Hauser and Jared Wogan, are currently working on a concrete multihistory time travel theory that is fully compatible with General Relativity.

But the physicist acknowledges, in a note for The Conversation: “Even if we did manage to find such a theory, this would not be enough to prove that time travel is possible, but it would at least mean that time travel is not ruled out by consistency paradoxes.”

Let’s open the doors and delve into Shoshany’s ideas.

Barak Shoshany’s hypotheses about time travel

According to the expert from Brock University, for decades, physicists have tried to use General Relativity to determine if time travel is possible: they have written equations that describe these trips, and they are fully compatible and consistent with relativity… but they do not correspond nothing with reality.

Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity combines space and time into a single entity, providing a complex explanation of how both work: it is based on the equivalence principles (acceleration and gravity as different aspects of the same reality), the notion of curvature of space-time and the generalized covariance principle.

According to Barak Shoshany, for decades, physicists have been trying to use General Relativity to determine if time travel is possible: they have written equations that describe this travel, and they are fully compatible and consistent with relativity… but they do not correspond at all with reality.

This theory predicts that the geometry of space-time is affected by the presence of matter.

To build a time machine it would be necessary exotic matter, Shoshany points out, which is matter with negative energy. All that we see in our daily lives is positive energy, but thanks to Quantum Mechanics, in theory, exotic matter can be created in very small quantities and for very short times.

“This problem it may just be a limitation of our current technology or our understanding of Quantum Mechanics.”Shoshany points out.

The paradoxes of consistency

One more problem raised by the Brock University physicist is that time travel seems to contradict logic, especially because of consistency paradoxes. These point out that whenever there is a certain event that leads to changing the past, the change itself prevents this event from happening in the first place.

So, when traveling, the reason for the trip is lost.

If a single paradox cannot be eliminated, time travel remains logically impossible.

The solution, according to Shoshany, it’s in allowing for multiple stories, or parallel timelines.

“When I step out of the time machine,” says the physicist, “I step out into a different timeline. In that timeline, I can do whatever I want, including destroying the time machine, without changing anything in the original timeline I came from. Since I can’t destroy the time machine in the original timeline, which is the one I used to time travel, there is no paradox.”

At the moment, everything Shoshany has said is just speculation. Will future technology be able to solve them?

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